Programming for Privacy

Teacher Test-Pilot Page

“Elaborate” Activities:

Use one or more of these lesson elements to go deeper into the underlying concepts and/or let students practice important privacy skills.

Mapping Geotagged Tweets (Beta Version)

Estimated Time: [Let us know!]
What You’ll Need: Computers for students.
Programming Language: Python.
Prerequisite: Introductory Python lessons.

Privacy Principle Illustrated: Your Information Footprint Is Larger Than You Think. Your information footprint is not just what you intentionally post online. It consists of all of the information that you post or that others post about you, the hidden data attached to those posts by the services you use, the record of your online activities, and also the inferences that can be drawn from putting that collective information together.
Our Advice: Periodically check your privacy settings and update them, if possible, to limit unintentional information sharing.

Programming Exercise (as Jupyter Notebook): https://github.com/jbernd/Teaching-Privacy/blob/master/Mapping_Geotagged_Tweets.ipynb

Solutions (as Jupyter Notebook): https://github.com/jbernd/Teaching-Privacy/blob/master/Mapping_Geotagged_Tweets_Solutions.ipynb

As a Google Doc, Suitable for Commenting On If You’re So Inclined: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1R9F1IOlyPz-KKOksxQCWoapNN7sYapAMl7HHmKOrrkE/edit?usp=sharing

What Can You Learn from Cross-Site Aggregation? (Beta Version)

Estimated Time: [Let us know!]
What You’ll Need: Computers for students.
Programming Language: Python.
Prerequisite: Introductory Python lessons.

Privacy Principle Illustrated: Information about You on the Internet Will Be Used by Somebody in Their Interest — Including Against You. Every piece of information, public or not, has value to somebody: to other people, to companies and organizations, or to governments. They will use your information however benefits them, which may be contrary to your interests — and possibly even embarrassing or dangerous to you.
Our Advice: Make informed choices; if you’re not sure how your information will be used, don’t share it.

Programming Exercise (as Jupyter Notebook): https://github.com/jbernd/Teaching-Privacy/blob/master/Learning_from_Cross-Site_Aggregation.ipynb

Solutions (as Jupyter Notebook): https://github.com/jbernd/Teaching-Privacy/blob/master/Learning_from_Cross-Site_Aggregation_Solutions.ipynb

As a Google Doc, Suitable for Commenting On If You’re So Inclined: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qwu0hNWP3fscN2zgoDqUJRoAdEsnVZvVaJy1fGjZmK8/edit?usp=sharing

What Does Facebook Tell Third Parties? (Beta Version)

Estimated Time: [Let us know!]
What You’ll Need: Computers for students.
Programming Language: Python.
Prerequisite: Introductory Python lessons.

Privacy Principle Illustrated: Sharing Information over a Network Means You Give Up Control over That Information — Forever. Any time you interact online, that information is recorded in the network. And, as with in-person communication, once you’ve shared something, you can’t control what happens to it — or how people will interpret it. Other people can repost or forward content to any audience without your permission, websites can sell information to other businesses, and data can be legally subpoenaed. Websites and search engines automatically pick up and duplicate content, making it impossible to “unshare” — the Internet never forgets!
Our Advice: Think twice before sharing anything online; ask yourself if you’d be comfortable becoming famous for it.

Programming Exercise (as Google Doc): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zSkgXfINFOC-svqr26o660FxYh_Uq0FGEKeQJB_0nPs/edit?usp=sharing

Solutions:

Exploring "Private Browsing" (Gamma Version)

Estimated Time: [Let us know!]
What You’ll Need: Computers for students.
Programming Languages: JavaScript, HTML/CSS.
Prerequisite: Introductory JavaScripting lessons.

Privacy Principle Illustrated: There Is No Anonymity on the Internet. Your information footprint on the Internet is like your body in the physical world: it represents your identity. Like seeing some part of your body, seeing some part of your information footprint — like the location of the device you’re posting from or the pattern of your language — may make it possible for someone to uniquely identify you even when there is no name or other explicit identifier attached.
Our Advice: Don’t do anything online that you wouldn’t do in public.

Programming Exercise (as Google Doc): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1K-ZzOMSIFawWGp2Ur8tPyr8W15S63rXcRao3ZoFbuvc/edit?usp=sharing

Starter Code: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/19M5YlHJEAwoY1JJOKVp5GAgjkcxOkvWS?usp=sharing

Solutions: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ZeaJn_ASrs6rBCYLdWu_vX0umO0xGwCu?usp=sharing

Caveat: This exercise is in draftier shape than the other three, so it may be more difficult to review. (Called ‘Gamma’ because we don’t know what comes before Alpha.)

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